Femoral Triangle

INTRODUCTION:
  • The femoral triangle (of Scarpa) is an anatomical region of the upper inner human thigh.
  • It is a subfascial space which in living people appears as a triangular depression inferior to the inguinal ligament when the thigh is flexed, abducted and laterally rotated.
STRUCTURE:
  • The femoral triangle is bounded:
  • superiorly by the inguinal ligament.
  • medially by the medial border of the adductor longus muscle.
  • laterally by the medial border of the sartorius muscle.
  • Its floor is formed by the pectineus and adductor longus muscles medially and iliopsoas muscle laterally.
  • Its roof is formed by the fascia lata, except at the saphenous opening where it is formed by the cribriform fascia.
CONTENTS:
  • The femoral triangle is important as a number of vital structures pass through it, right under the skin. 
  • The following structures are contained within the femoral triangle (from lateral to medial):
  1. Femoral nerve and its (terminal) branches.
  2. Femoral sheath and its contents:
  • Femoral artery and several of its branches.
  • Femoral vein and its proximal tributaries (e.g., the great saphenous and deep femoral veins).
  • Deep inguinal lymph nodes and associated lymphatic vessels.
Exam Question
  • Lymphatics is the medial most structure in femoral triangle 
  • Lateral margin of femoral triangle is formed by sartorius
  • Femoral vessels lies in femoral triangle 
  • Femoral triangle floor is formed by pectineus and adductor longus muscles medially and iliopsoas muscle laterally.

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